Bats

Bats of Vanuatu exhibition in Port Vila

The one-week exhibition started Monday, 8 April and will end on Saturday, 13 April 2019.

The exhibition is part of the project called ‘Conservation of the Endemic Flying Foxes of Torba and Temotu in Vanuatu and Solomon islands.

The project focuses on three species of threatened flying foxes, Banks flying fox in Vanuatu, Temotu flying fox and Vanikoro flying fox in Solomon Islands.

The VESS has confirmed that part of the project is an expedition to the islands where these species of threatened flying foxes occurred.

Bats of Vanuatu exhibition in Port Vila

The one-week exhibition started Monday, 8 April and will end on Saturday, 13 April 2019.

The exhibition is part of the project called ‘Conservation of the Endemic Flying Foxes of Torba and Temotu in Vanuatu and Solomon islands.

The project focuses on three species of threatened flying foxes, Banks flying fox in Vanuatu, Temotu flying fox and Vanikoro flying fox in Solomon Islands.

The VESS has confirmed that part of the project is an expedition to the islands where these species of threatened flying foxes occurred.

How one heatwave killed 'a third' of a bat species in Australia

The animals, also known as spectacled fruit bats, were unable to survive in temperatures which exceeded 42C.

In the city of Cairns, locals saw bats toppling from trees into backyards, swimming pools and other locations.

Wildlife rescuers found surviving animals clumped together, usually on branches closer to the ground.

"It was totally depressing," one rescuer, David White, told the BBC.

Last week, researchers from Western Sydney University finalised their conclusion that about 23,000 spectacled flying foxes died in the event on 26 and 27 November.