Cancer

How I prepared my son for the death of his mum

It's a heartbreaking sentence to hear from a six-year-old.

When Tina was diagnosed with secondary breast cancer in 2010, five months after Lucas was born, she and her husband Aaron were devastated.

But after chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery and hormone therapy, she was as doctors called her "a miracle" and well for another three years — until the cancer returned.

"We were married for almost 14 years," Aaron said.

"I was worried Tina would never hear Lucas say his first words, call her mum ... that she would die before he had fully developed that bond.

Maria Menounos recovering from brain tumor surgery

The annoucement came the same day Menounos revealed in a People magazine cover story that she recently underwent surgery for a golf ball-size meningioma brain tumor.

Menounos' surgeon was able to remove almost 100% of the tumor, which was benign, during a complicated seven-hour surgery, she told the publication.

"He said there's a six to seven percent chance that we'll see it come back," said Menounos, who is recovering at home. "But I'll take those odds any day."

Prostate cancer blood test 'helps target treatment'

The test detects cancer DNA in the blood, helping doctors check whether precision drugs are working.

Cancer Research UK said the test could "greatly improve survival".

But larger studies involving more men needed to take place to confirm if doctors could rely on the test, the charity said.

Blood samples from 49 men with advanced prostate cancer were collected by researchers, as part of the phase II clinical trial of a drug called olaparib.

Teen model meets fashion idols after beating cancer

Two years on from her Ewing's sarcoma diagnosis, Ms Harris is in remission and on a high after meeting two of the world's fashion greats at Sydney's Mercedes Benz Fashion Week.

"I was given five days down in Sydney to meet my idols. I met Alex Perry the designer and Samantha Harris the Indigenous model," she said about her recent Make a Wish experience.

Boobs and Brass: The female band raising cash for breast cancer

Eleven years on, they have raised £200,000 for charity and have more than 600 members across the UK.

On Friday, Boobs and Brass was given the BBC Music Day Brass Band Award, for the band that best embodies the BBC Music Day 2017 theme - "the power of music".

The band was born when brass musicians Jane Nichols and Maggie Betts decided to call on all the female players they knew for a charity concert.

With a 25-strong band, the friends expected to raise a few hundred pounds. In fact, they took £5,000.

Val Kilmer makes cancer admission

While answering questions put to him by Reddit users, the actor revealed he "did have a healing of cancer" and was still dealing with a swollen tongue.

"Because I don't sound my normal self yet people think I may still be under the weather," the 57-year-old wrote.

Speculation over Kilmer's health grew last year after Michael Douglas said he was "dealing with" throat cancer.

The former Batman actor responded at the time by saying Douglas was "misinformed".

'Exciting' blood test spots cancer a year early

The UK team was able to scour the blood for signs of cancer while it was just a tiny cluster of cells invisible to X-ray or CT scans.

It should allow doctors to hit the tumour earlier and increase the chances of a cure.

They also have new ideas for drugs after finding how unstable DNA fuels rampant cancer development.

The research project was on lung cancer, but the processes studied are so fundamental that they should apply across all cancer types.

Children exposed to CT scans face increased risk of developing cancer

CT scans are used by doctors to get to the core of a problem by creating a 3D image of the most inaccessible nooks of the body.

But the beams of ionising radiation can cause cellular damage.

A fresh analysis of 2013 research is being presented by researchers from the University of Melbourne at the World Congress of Public Health in Melbourne.

They said the radiation risk was much greater than previously acknowledged.

The results indicated that most of the excess cancers occurring more than two years after a CT scan were caused by radiation from the scan.

'Bad luck' mutations increase cancer risk more than behavior, study says

Overall, 66% of the genetic mutations that develop into cancer are caused by simple random errors occurring when cells replace themselves, according to a new study published in the journal Science.

Environmental factors contribute 29% of mutations, while the remaining 5% are inherited, say Cristian Tomasetti and Dr. Bert Vogelstein, both of Johns Hopkins University.

New drug for one in five breast cancers

Biological therapies can help fight breast cancers caused by rare, inherited genetic errors like the BRCA one actress Angelina Jolie carries.

Now a new study by experts at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute suggests these targeted drugs may also work in many other women who do not have these risky genes.

The drugs could be effective in one in five breast cancers, say the researchers.

That's 20% of patients - far more than the 1 to 5% who develop the cancer alongside having faulty BRCA genes.