European Commission

EU reveals plan to regulate Big Tech

Fresh restrictions are also planned to govern their use of customers' data, and to prevent the firms ranking their own services above competitors' in search results and app stores.

The measures are intended to overhaul how the EU regulates digital markets.

Large fines and break-ups are threatened for non-compliance.

It is proposed that if companies refuse to obey, they could be forced to hand over up to 10% of their European turnover.

EU announces K90m COVID-19 programme

The programme will boost the readiness and ability of 15 countries* to effectively combat and protect themselves against the pandemic. It will pay special attention to those living in vulnerable situations.  

Experts warn Europe: Don't grant robots rights

The European Parliament passed a resolution last year that envisions a special legal status of "electronic persons" for the most sophisticated autonomous robots.

The proposal is being considered by the European Commission, Europe's top regulator.

More than 150 experts in robotics, artificial intelligence, law, medical science and ethics weighed into the debate on Thursday, with a clear warning against such a move.

In an open letter to the European Commission, they said the proposals appear to be influenced more by science fiction than the real world.

Brexit: UK 'will not enter into briefing war' with EC

It follows reports in a German paper of repeated clashes between Theresa May and Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker at a Downing Street dinner.

EU sources claimed UK misunderstanding of the talks process, and ignorance about how Brussels works, could lead to no deal being agreed on the UK's exit.

Home Secretary Amber Rudd said the reports were "tittle-tattle".

She said the emergence of the reports was "not the right way" of negotiating, but the UK was committed to negotiating in "good faith".

Ex-European Commission head Barroso under fire

French Europe Minister Harlem Desir called the move "scandalous" and said it raised questions about the EU's conflict of interest rules.

Ex-commissioners are free to take up a new role 18 months after leaving.

Despite accepting the job after 20 months, Mr Barroso has come under fire for ignoring the spirit of the rules.

Mr Desir drew attention to the ill-timing of the job with Goldman Sachs.