Fisheries

US frustrates Pacific countries with fishing deal reversal

During August negotiations, the US fleets demanded extra fishing days, despite needing less than expected in 2015.

Pacific nations complied with the request and signed the deal, worth more than USD 68 million.

American Samoa Governor says US must protest fishing zone

Lolo Moliga has asked the US Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker to reject the Western Pacific Fishery Management Council's resolution to allow longliners access.

If the council's resolution is approved it would temporarily allow vessels of 15 metres or longer to fish within 20 kilometres of the territory's shores.

At the moment the area up to 80 kilometres offshore is reserved for alia fishing.

Tuna stakeholders looking for balance in the Pacific

Stakeholders from all over the world are in Fiji this week to talk about the challenges facing the Pacific Tuna Industry.

The Chief Executive of the Pacific Tuna Industry Association, Tima Tepou says having all stakeholders at the same table has resulted in frank discussions on what different parties want for the future of the industry.

NZ has a lot to learn about Pacific Tuna: PNA

Dr Aqorau was responding to a New Zealand-led push at the Pacific Islands Forum to help shift the region away from daily catches via the Vessel Day Scheme.

The scheme has brought rising incomes to PNA countries but New Zealand says advances in technology and bigger fishing boats are resulting in larger catches which could render the scheme unsustainable.

Dr Aqorau says the only areas in which unsustainable catches are occurring are those outside the control of its Vessel Day Scheme.

Pacific Forum communique finally released

The communique was issued more than 12 hours after the end of Thursday's leaders' retreat.

The issue of the fisheries was the big winner from the leader's summit, while an acceptance of varying viewpoints marks the statement on climate change.

Koro Vaka'uta reports:

Australia to give $19million surveillance aid to Pacific Island countries

Prime Minister Tony Abbott revealed this to the media tonight after the Pacific Island Forum Leaders’ retreat in Port Moresby.

“Australia will be increasing its Ariel surveillance of the Pacific (Ocean) and will be committing additional $19million a year so the fisheries (industry) can be properly patrolled and policed,” Abbott said.

Australia will also be giving a new patrol boat to monitor illegal fishing in the PIF nation’s exclusive economic zone. 

He said a “stronger economy is vital and fishing and tourism is a mainstay of Pacific economies.”

Pacific Fisheries high on PIF agenda

Topics on discussion for the Pacific Island Forum leaders’ summit are;

1.            Increase return from fisheries and maritime surveillance

2.            Climate risk and disaster risk management

3.            Information and communication technology

4.            West Papua

5.            Cervical cancer  

The Pacific Ocean is the largest in the world and accounts for three thirds of the world’s tuna stock but this does not translate into revenue.

Fisheries Observers in six weeks training

The 35 observers were divided into two groups with one group doing sea time at the Solomon Islands National University (SINU) and the other group undertaking the Pacific Islands Regional Fisheries Observer Syllabus Programme.

A statement from government said each group did five weeks of intensive training before going for the second part which will take another five weeks.

Deputy Director Offshore, Edward Honiwala who officially opened the second part of the programme said the observers will spend another five weeks before completing the programme.

Solomon Islands fisheries officers receives new outfit

The uniforms which included overall suits, boots and caps will be worn when carrying out their duties.

The assistance was made possible by Pete Southern from the Ministry of Primary Industries in New Zealand who initiated the process to procure the uniforms.

A similar assistance was received in 2013.

“In 2013 we received eight pairs of overall suits, boots and caps funded by the New Zealand Government and it was Pete Southern who organized them for us,” said Chief Fisheries Officer Charles Tobasala.