Flash flooding

Tennessee flash floods kill 22 with dozens missing

Rescue crews are still searching for dozens of people in rural Humphreys County, which is west of Nashville.

The record-breaking flooding began on Saturday, submerging entire roads and taking out telephone and power lines.

Emergency workers are searching door-to-door in the worst-hit areas, with rescuers also combing through the debris of homes that were washed away.

The names of the missing have been listed on a notice board at an emergency centre in Humphreys County, with relatives left fearing the worst.

Death toll near Black Sea rises to 31

Kastamonu province is the worst-hit area, accounting for 29 of the deaths. Two others died in Sinop on the coast.

The floods caused some buildings to collapse, smashed several bridges, clogged some streets with wrecked cars and cut power supplies.

This month Turkey has also had to battle huge wildfires in the south.

Those fires - which are now under control - forced thousands of locals and tourists to flee Marmaris and surrounding areas. Eight people died and more than 100,000 hectares (247,000 acres) of vegetation was devastated.

Afghanistan Taliban: Flash flooding kills dozens in remote province

Children and women are said to be among the victims in Kamdesh, with at least 60 people dead and dozens more missing, and many homes destroyed.

The disaster zone is held by Taliban militants fighting the government.

Talks are being held to try to let rescue teams enter the area which is hard to reach in normal times.

Afghan officials gave a death toll of 60 but the Taliban say 150 people died in the flooding, the Associated Press news agency reports.

Rains ease, but fears persist over water levels

Parts of New South Wales have seen almost 1m (3.2ft) of rain, flooding hundreds of homes and severing roads.

Despite the rains subsiding, water levels have not yet peaked in some areas, the Bureau of Meteorology says.

Around 18,000 people in NSW have been displaced.

"It is catastrophic in its dimensions," said NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said Western Sydney was now the "greatest concern".

He said Sydney's largest dam would continue to spill over for at least another week.

Worst flooding in decades sweeps away homes and animals

Parts of New South Wales have seen almost 1m of rain and more is forecast with the peak coming on Tuesday.

Thousands of people have been evacuated and troops deployed as the government warned the floods were extremely dangerous.

Millions in most of the country are under weather warnings.

No deaths have been reported which New South Wales (NSW) Premier Gladys Berejiklian called a "miracle given what we have been through". Prime Minister Scott Morrison told MPs there was "serious risk still ahead"

Hurricane Sally swamps US Gulf Coast with massive floods, 'unreal' rain

Some parts of the Gulf Coast have already been inundated with more than 18 inches (46 cm) of rain in the last 24 hours, with more precipitation expected even as the storm's winds slow, the National Hurricane Center said.

Pensacola, Florida, a coastal resort community of 50,000, suffered up to five feet of flooding and travel was cut by damaged roads and bridges. More than 500,000 homes and businesses across the area were without power as the storm knocked over stately oak trees and tore power lines from poles.

Kenya, Somalia and Rwanda hit by deadly flooding

Kenya has been the hardest hit with the government recording 194 deaths.

In Rwanda, 55 people have died and floods have killed 16 in Somalia. In Uganda high water levels have trapped an estimated 200 patients inside a hospital.

East African countries have also been hit by a locust invasion and Covid-19.

The authorities in Kenya have told people in some of the affected areas to move away from "potential danger".

The water has also washed away 8,000 acres of crops and some vital infrastructure, the government has said.

'Epic' amounts of rain unloaded on Carolinas

It has caused catastrophic flooding since arriving as a category one hurricane on Friday.

Some towns have already seen 2ft (60cm) of rain in two days, with totals forecast to top 3.5ft (1m) in places.

It is feared that more communities could become deluged as the storm crawls west at only 2mph (3km/h).

"This system is unloading epic amounts of rainfall, in some places measured in feet and not inches," North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper said on Saturday.