TC Harold

Vanuatu NDMO clarifies all foreign supplies must be processed in Port Vila

She made the statement following public criticisms about the response time from the National Disaster Management Office (NDMO) to communities affected by Cyclone Harold.

Mrs Garaebiti, who is also the Director General of the Ministry of Climate Change, says all relief items must be cleaned, disinfected in Port Vila, to minimise the risk of spreading the deadly Coronavirus/COVID-19 before distribution of the items to the affected areas.

TC Harold leaves one dead, dozens injured and more than 2000 homes destroyed in Fiji

According to the National Disaster Management Office (NDMO) one person was killed and 26 others injured by the category four cyclone which also destroyed more than 2000 homes.

The NDMO director Vasiti Soko said TC Harold forced hundreds of families to flee their homes with over 1500 people still sheltering in evacuation centres across Fiji's central, eastern and western divisions.

Ms Soko said relief teams were distributing food, shelter kits and medical supplies while continuing their disaster assessments in the remote islands.

Australia sends cyclone aid to Vanuatu

As part of $US2.5 million relief package, an Australian Air Force plane this week brought items including hygiene, shelter and kitchen kits to Port Vila.

Australia's High Commissioner to Vanuatu, Sarah de Zoeten, said the relief package will be used by the Vanuatu government to support NGO responses on the ground.

She said this could include setting up health centres.

The Vanuatu Daily Post reports Australia complied with strict Covid-19 protocols when delivering its aid.

Humanitarian supplies for cyclone-hit Vanuatu arrive from New Caledonia

A Casa air force plane carried a consignment of kits for those made homeless by last week's category five storm which ravaged the central islands of Pentecost, Espiritu Santo and Ambae.

According to the Vanuatu Red Cross, most people in the disaster zone have lost their homes.

The kits were made up of tents, basic kitchen items which had been held in stock by the Red Cross in Noumea as part of the emergency support provided by France, Australia and New Zealand.

UN to spend $2.5 million on emergency aid for Vanuatu

The world body announced Monday $2.5 million from its emergency response fund will be spent to get lifesaving aid to thousands of people in Vanuatu affected by Tropical Cyclone Harold. 

U.N. humanitarian chief Mark Lowcock said in a written statement the cyclone “has wreaked havoc in Vanuatu, destroying homes, schools, roads and crops.”

The statement said the funds will enable its agencies to get safe drinking water, food, shelter and health care “where they are most needed.” 

Over 1,000 schools in Vanuatu damaged by TC Harold

The Ministry of Education and Training released the detail after their assessment from the cyclone affected areas.

The Ministry’s Director General, Bergsman Iati said they are assessing the impact on these affected kindergartens, primary schools, colleges and vocational institutions via satellite before deploying officers on ground.

DG Iati said the ministry is also assessing the welfare of teachers.

NZ aid charities to help Pacific neighbours after Cyclone Harold

They are helping the three Pacific countries battered by Cyclone Harold last week, Vanuatu, Tonga, and Fiji.

But the executive director of the Council of International Development, Josie Pagani, said that during the lockdown the charities aren't able to fundraise and the public can't donate.

She said the international aid charities typically get about two thirds of their revenue from public donations.

Cyclone Harold, the worst to hit Vanuatu since deadly Cyclone Pam in 2015, has wrecked around 70 percent of the buildings in Luganville, and much of the vegetation.

Many homeless or without electricity in Fiji after Cyclone Harold

Over 1700 people remained in evacuation centres in Fiji today following the severe tropical cyclone.

The storm passed through the country last Tuesday and Wednesday as a category four system.

Most evacuees are in 29 shelters in the smaller islands of the Eastern Division where, last night, 1067 people remained.

Central and Western Divisions held 384 and 252 displaced people respectively between 32 shelters.

The Northern Division had been given the all-clear but remained under Covid-19 restrictions.

NGO backs Vanuatu's disaster officials as it gets OK to distribute aid

Last week the monster storm tore through the middle of the country, destroying homes and food gardens.

Four deaths were linked to the cyclone while dozens were injured and thousands rendered homeless.

The country's acting deputy prime minister Jotham Napat publicly criticised the disaster management office, saying its response has been too slow.

But the communications manager for World Vision Vanuatu, Mike Kaun said the country's disaster officials were doing the best they could under difficult circumstances.

Vanuatu Acting DPM raises concern over TC Harold response

“Without the support of the private sector and surveillance by Australian and NZ military aircraft, I’m not sure our most affected communities would have received any help at all,” Mr Napat said.

“If the director general and the director of NDMO cannot coordinate an immediate response they should both consider resigning.”

“Concerns have been raised at the slow response time from the National Disaster Management Office to communities affected by Cyclone Harold.