UK

UK to expel 23 Russian diplomats

Theresa May said the diplomats, who have a week to leave, were identified as "undeclared intelligence officers".

The UK later told the UN Security Council that Russia had used "a weapon so horrific that it is banned in war" in a "peaceful" British city.

Russia denies attempted murder and says it will respond appropriately.

Mrs May also revoked an invitation to Russia's foreign minister, and said the Royal Family would not attend the Fifa World Cup in Russia later this year.

UK TV drama about North Korea hit by cyber-attack

The series - due to be written by an Oscar-nominated screenwriter - has been shelved.

In August 2014, Channel 4 announced what it said would be a new "bold and provocative" drama series.

Titled Opposite Number, the programme's plot involved a British nuclear scientist taken prisoner in North Korea.

The production firm involved - Mammoth Screen - subsequently had its computers attacked.

The project has not moved forward because of a failure to secure funding, the company says.

 

'Hair on fire'

Brexit: UK 'will not enter into briefing war' with EC

It follows reports in a German paper of repeated clashes between Theresa May and Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker at a Downing Street dinner.

EU sources claimed UK misunderstanding of the talks process, and ignorance about how Brussels works, could lead to no deal being agreed on the UK's exit.

Home Secretary Amber Rudd said the reports were "tittle-tattle".

She said the emergence of the reports was "not the right way" of negotiating, but the UK was committed to negotiating in "good faith".

'Serious' hack attacks from China targeting UK firms

The gang behind the attacks has compromised technology service firms and plans to use them as a proxy for attacks, security firms have said.

The group, dubbed APT10, is using custom-made malware and spear phishing to gain access to target companies.

The National Cyber Security Centre and cyber units at PwC and BAE Systems collaborated to identify the group.

"Operating alone, none of us would have joined the dots to uncover this new campaign of indirect attacks," said Richard Horne, cyber security partner at PwC.

 

Known victims

Teen asylum seeker brutally attacked in UK

Police said that a group of about 20 people were involved in the attack on the 17-year-old in Croydon, south-east London, which they said was being treated as a hate crime.

The Press Association said the teenager was Kurdish Iranian and suffered a fractured skull and a blood clot on his brain. Police have not identified the victim.

Four people were charged with violent disorder, and one with violent disorder and grievous bodily harm, police said, They will appear in court later.

 

Teenager in hospital

Google Home to be launched in UK in April

Google said it had "hidden a few British treats" in the device.

The speaker and assistant, which launched in the US in November, is part of a growing trend to make artificial intelligence available in homes.

The firm is also launching its own wi-fi service in the UK, in an attempt to solve the "frustration when wireless connectivity fails at home".

Like Amazon's Echo, Home can answer basic queries as well as control smart home devices, such as lights.

UK demands Encryption Backdoor as London Terrorist used WhatsApp before the attack

Following last week's terrorist attack in London, the UK government is accusing technology firms to give terrorists "a place to hide," saying Intelligence agencies must have access to encrypted messaging applications such as WhatsApp to prevent such attacks.

'Three-parent' babies: UK clinic gets OK for groundbreaking technique

Brexit bill: Parliament clears way for talks with EU

Peers backed down over the issues of EU residency rights and a meaningful vote on the final Brexit deal after their objections were overturned by MPs.

The bill is expected to receive Royal Assent and become law on Tuesday.

The BBC's Laura Kuenssberg said this would leave Theresa May free to push the button on withdrawal talks.

EU could demand £1.7bn from UK after customs fraud probe

Clothes and shoes were imported through the UK at fictitiously low values for years to avoid duties, the European Anti-Fraud Office (Olaf) has found.

As a result, investigators say the EU budget has lost millions of pounds in customs duties.

HMRC said it plans to challenge Olaf's claims about lost revenues.

The Olaf investigation found the UK to be a "significant hub" for so-called undervaluation fraud - where importers can profit from evading customs duties and related taxes.