Women

Haim: The music industry needs more women

"We do see women working in the studios but we want to see more. It's a quantity issue," they tell Newsbeat.

The three sisters were speaking before their Radio 1 Live Lounge performance.

"There's so many amazing women that work in music and I think its time more girls looked into being engineers and studio technicians," explains Danielle.

Earlier this month Haim released their second studio album, Something to Tell You.

Haim: The music industry needs more women

"We do see women working in the studios but we want to see more. It's a quantity issue," they tell Newsbeat.

The three sisters were speaking before their Radio 1 Live Lounge performance.

"There's so many amazing women that work in music and I think its time more girls looked into being engineers and studio technicians," explains Danielle.

Earlier this month Haim released their second studio album, Something to Tell You.

Creating a 'safe space' for women

Its first real-life festival has taken place in London, with talks and workshops.

"I told other girls they could open up to me, so I'm not leaving," says founder and model Adwoa Aboah, who's had her own struggles with depression.

"The moment I opened my mouth I took on that responsibility."

Hundreds of young women and men came along to the free event.

Woman of Substances: Why Jenny Valentish is lifting the veil on women's addiction

"I was trying to control [my alcohol addiction]," Valentish tells ABC News.

"I was trying to do anything but quit. I went to a hypnotist, I kept going to the doctor — who put me on antidepressants even though she acknowledged I wasn't depressed; I went to counselling.

"I thought, [the drinking] can't stop, I don't know anything but this."

Indeed, having started drinking at the age of 13 — and using drugs including hash, ecstasy, speed, heroin, and crack in her late teens and early 20s — at 34, Valentish had lived the majority of her life addicted to substances.

Aussie hip-hop sisterhood is breaking down barriers

"I'm having a visual of, like, people walking in the street for a cause," Akimera Burckhardt-Bedeau tells a group of women sitting around her.

"We are building a community out there, of women, who are out there doing it in hip-hop," she told News Breakfast later on.

Ms Burckhardt-Bedeau is lead facilitator at Sisters on the Mic — a program for women learning the hip-hop ropes — but she prefers to go with just Akimera on stage.

A history of Mother's Day: From campaigns for peace to cards, flowers and family reunions

Some mums may be given cards, flowers and gifts, while others may enjoy breakfast in bed or a lunch out.

Mother's Day has long been a part of the Australian calendar, but where did the idea to dedicate the second Sunday in May to honouring motherhood come from?

The modern Australian celebration of Mother's Day actually grew out of calls for peace and anti-war campaigns following the American Civil War (1861-65).

Canada province makes high heels optional

The government of British Columbia (BC) says the requirement is discriminatory as well as being a health and safety issue because they are dangerous.

It says that high heel wearers face a risk of physical injury from slipping or falling as well as possible damage to the feet, legs and back.

Footwear should be designed to allow workers to operate safely, it says.

The announcement of the ban comes after a provincial Green party politician in March introduced a bill in the BC legislature aimed at preventing employers from setting gender-based footwear requirements.

Nicole Kidman sparkes crucial conversation about domestic violence

But when you're playing the part of a woman who dabs makeup on bruises inflicted by the man she loves, incongruity is also apt.

Kidman has told reporters that immersing herself in the character of a woman married to an abusive, violent, controlling man was a gruelling one.

While filming, she would return to her hotel room at night hunting for painkillers, covered in bruises.

How 7 different women save their money

You're not alone if you feel way more comfortable dishing out the details of your sex life to your BFFs than you are revealing how much you earn. But money — earning it, spending it, saving it — is essential, and just having a casual convo about ca$h could inspire you to take a good, hard look at your own financial situation. Seven women from around the U.S. shared how much they're making and how much they're saving — and why they're saving it.

Music video highlights generational conflict between modesty and modernity

PNG has strict laws against pornography and strong censorship of sexually related content in movies and television.

But rapper Tati Mangi has pushed the boundaries of what's acceptable with a video clip that's got the whole country talking.

Who knew women's backsides could cause such a fuss?

Tati Mangi probably did, but he released a video clip for his song Bootilicious featuring young PNG women dancing in bikinis anyway.