Pope Francis

Pope slammed for likening refugee centers to 'concentration camps'

"I don't know if he was able to get out of that concentration camp, because the refugee camps -- many -- are concentration (camps), because they are so crowded with people," the Pope said in Italian.

The AJC issued a statement asking the pontiff to reconsider his "regrettable" choice of words.

"The conditions in which migrants are currently living in some European countries may well be difficult, and deserve still greater international attention, but concentration camps they certainly are not," said AJC CEO David Harris.

Pope Francis: We find hope in embracing our crosses with love

“During these days, days of love, let us be enveloped by the mystery of Jesus who, like a grain of wheat, in dying gives us life. He is the seed of our hope,” the Pope said April 12.

“Let us contemplate the Crucified Christ, the source of hope. Little by little we realize that hope with Jesus is learning to see, indeed right now, the plant in the seed, Easter in the cross, life in death.”

Pope signals he's open to married Catholic men becoming priests

In an interview with German newspaper Die Zeit, Pope Francis said the lack of Catholic priests was an "enormous problem" for the Church, and indicated he would be open to a change in the rules governing eligibility for the priesthood.

"We need to consider if 'viri probati' could be a possibility," he said. "If so, we would need to determine what duties they could undertake, for example, in remote communities."

Viri probati is the Latin term for "tested men" or married men of outstanding faith and virtue.

Pope:Be atheist than a bad Christian

"So many Christians are like this, and these people scandalize others," Francis said during morning Mass at Casa Santa Marta, according to Vatican Radio. "How many times have we heard -- all of us, around the neighborhood and elsewhere -- 'But to be a Catholic like that, it's better to be an atheist.' It is that: scandal."

Posters critical of Pope Francis appear around Rome

Written in local Roman dialect, the posters lamented that the Pope had "removed priests; decapitated the Knights of Malta" and "ignored Cardinals," echoing some of the major complaints some conservative Catholics have about Pope Francis' recent decisions. The posters were not signed by any group.

On the day the posters appeared the Pope finalized a months-long battle with the Knights of Malta by appointing a Special Delegate from the Vatican and giving him "all necessary powers" to help renew the traditional Catholic Order.

Bishop of Kerema given higher calling

Fr. Peter Baquero was born in Manila (Philippines) on September 15, 1970, and made perpetual profession in 1998 and was ordained in 1999 in Parañaque.

From the period of his practical training in PNG he followed the missionary vocation ad gentes.

Pope Francis warns against rise in populism

He made the comments as Donald Trump was being sworn-in as US president in a wide-ranging interview with Spanish newspaper El Pais.

The Pope condemned the use of walls and barbed-wire to keep foreigners out.

But he said it was too early to judge the new US leader, saying "we'll see what Trump does".

Mr Trump has caused controversy with his comments on Mexican immigrants and his plans for a wall to keep them out.

Pope urges 'zero tolerance' of abuse in letter

In a letter sent on 28 December but released by the Vatican on Monday, the pope said he begged forgiveness for "a sin that shames us".

"I would like us to renew our complete commitment to ensuring that these atrocities will no longer take place in our midst."

Since his election in 2013, Pope Francis has taken some steps to root out sexual abuse in the Catholic Church and introduce practices to protect children. But victims' groups say he has not done enough, particularly to hold to account bishops who tolerated sexual abuse or covered it up.

Pope Francis marks Christmas Mass at Vatican

The head of the Catholic Church denounced the continuing suffering of children.

Pope Francis extends Catholic priests' right to forgive abortion

It continues a special dispensation granted last year for duration of the Year of Mercy, which finished Sunday.

The letter states: "I wish to restate as firmly as I can that abortion is a grave sin, since it puts an end to an innocent life. In the same way, however, I can and must state that there is no sin that God's mercy cannot reach and wipe away when it finds a repentant heart seeking to be reconciled with the Father."

"May every priest, therefore, be a guide, support and comfort to penitents on this journey of special reconciliation," the letter continues.