Pope Francis

Pope decries environmental damage, then visits ground zero

The Pope then paid tribute to the victims of 9/11 with a prayer service at ground zero.

Francis' agenda for his first full day in New York was packed with contrasts befitting a head of state dubbed the "slum pope."

Pope brings ecology, anti-poverty message to UN

     

Francis' agenda reflected both his global stature and his of-the-people approach, taking him from the solemnity of ground zero to the struggles of East Harlem.

His visit was scheduled to include events as large as a processional drive through Central Park, as personal as meetings with schoolchildren and immigrants, and as inspiring for the faithful as Mass for thousands at Madison Square Garden.

21-gun salute at White House for Chinese leader

The ceremony for the Chinese leader looks similar to the one the White House held Wednesday for Pope Francis, but with a few notable exceptions.

Pope wants technology to make us better humans

When the pontiff called on Congress to take "courageous action" on climate change, he also talked about the role he sees for technology in the world, quoting a papal encyclical published earlier this year.

“We have the freedom needed to limit and direct technology,” Francis said, “to devise intelligent ways of developing and limiting our power, and to put technology at the service of another type of progress, one which is healthier, more human, more social, more integral."

The Latest: Pope off to NY for next leg of US journey

Francis made a last round of greetings and selfies with Washington-area students, pausing to pat a little girl's face and touch boys' heads as he made his way to the black Fiat carrying him to Andrews Air Force Base.

He will fly to Kennedy Airport, where his greeting party includes Cardinal Timothy Dolan and 200 indigent people.

Francis' plans Thursday evening include a motorcade along Fifth Avenue and a vespers service at St. Patrick's Cathedral.

Argentine family finishes 6-month papal pilgrimage in old VW

It has been the trip of a lifetime for Catire Walker and Noel Zemborain, who quit their respective jobs in food service and marketing to lead their four children on an unforgettable tour of the Americas.

Their destination: The World Meeting of Families in Philadelphia, a Vatican-sponsored conference designed to strengthen family bonds. Pope Francis will close the event at a Saturday night festival and celebrate a public Mass the following day.

Pope Francis urges Congress to embrace migrants

Referencing the migration crisis in Europe as well as the United States' own struggle with immigration from Latin America, Francis summoned lawmakers "to respond in a way which is always humane, just and fraternal."

"We must not be taken aback by their numbers, but rather view them as persons, seeing their faces and listening to their stories, trying to respond as best as we can to their situation," Francis urged.

Pope's security faces Capitol test after parade incident

Clutching a yellow T-shirt and a note about immigration, she was someplace she wasn't supposed to be. The uniformed security officer and another in a suit coming toward her probably seemed intimidating. It wasn't until Francis himself motioned to her that she relented and let a security agent carry her to side of the open-air Jeep.

Standing in the popemobile, the pope did what this pope so often does: He gave her a hug and kiss. And Cruz made sure she stuck around long enough to give the pope the shirt and her message.

Apple warns Pope could delay iPhone 6S

Apple has warned that Pope Francis's impending visit to New York could stop the city's residents receiving their iPhone 6S pre-orders in time for this Friday's launch.

With traffic restrictions being placed on the bustling city during the pontiff's stay, it is expected that couriers will be unable to meet all delivery needs on the day.

The Latest: Pope is rebuked for words on sex abuse crisis

The Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests said bishops had displayed "cowardice and callousness" in response to victims who came forward. The group said they "hide behind expensive lawyers and public relations professionals" instead of fully confronting the scope of the problem within the church.

Anne Barrett Doyle is co-director of BishopAccountability.org, an advocacy group that collects records on abusive priests from around the world. She calls the pope's remarks "distressing and quite off-base."